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Field Guide

This page contains completely amateur medical information and should not be trusted by any person whatsoever. It should not be used in place of a trained physician The author takes no responsibility for any harm you do to yourself by following this guide. This guide is for me to be used by me in an emergency only.

IV Use

Prep

  1. Hang Bag
  2. Block tubing w/ roller
  3. Stick Bag
  4. Fill 1/2 Chamber by squeezing
  5. Purge line, remove all bubbles

Execution

#Apply tourniquet #Find vein #Sterilize area #Stick vein #Apply pressure on cannula in vein #Retract needle #Connect tubing #Apply Occlusive Dressing #Start drip w/ Roller #Adjust drip rate

Adjustment

Infusion Rates:

FleboTex Drop Factor: 15 drops/1mL

Drops per 30 seconds:

Drug Information

Chloroquine- Malaria/Extraintestinal Amoeba

*Prevention: 500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base) orally on the same day each week starting 2 weeks prior to exposure If unable to start 2 weeks before exposure, an initial loading dose of 1 g chloroquine phosphate (600 mg base) may be taken orally in 2 divided doses, 6 hours apart. **Suppressive therapy should continue for 8 weeks after leaving the endemic area. *Treatment- Malaria: 1 g chloroquine phosphate (600 mg base) orally at once, followed by 500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base) orally at 6, 24, and 48 hours; represents a total dose of 2.5 g chloroquine phosphate (1.5 g base) in 3 days. *Treatment- Extraintestinal Amebiasis: 1 g chloroquine phosphate (600 mg base) orally once a day for 2 days, followed by 500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base) orally once a day for at least 2 to 3 weeks *Reference: http://www.drugs.com/mtm/chloroquine.html

Diagnostics

Malaria

Extraintestinal Amebiasis

Symptoms of liver infection from extraintestinal amebiasis include right upper abdominal pain, fever, chills, jaundice, loss of appetite, fatigue, excessive sweating, and weight loss. Symptoms of lung and chest infection from extraintestinal amebiasis include productive cough, chest pain, chest congestion, and difficulty breathing.

An infection by the parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, can cause inflammation of the intestine. A person with extraintestinal amebiasis has infection by this parasite in tissues outside the intestines. The liver is the most common location for the infection. Transmission occurs by ingesting cysts in contaminated food or water, or by person-to-person contact. Most cases are treated successfully with antibiotics. Extraintestinal amebiasis is rare in the US, but it is a common parasitic infection in the developing world.

field_guide.txt · Last modified: 2014/09/04 14:31 (external edit)